Setting up a tenant-specific endpoint when using the Microsoft.AspNetCore.Authentication.MicrosoftAccount authentication handler in a new application


June 16, 2022   ·   3 min read  ·   Edit on GitHub 

Tagged as:

I was recently tasked with setting up internal/employee authentication using Microsoft Accounts on the new web project that my company is making, and since we’re using ASP.NET Core (Blazor Server) as our framework, it was only natural for me to turn to the Microsoft.AspNetCore.Authentication.MicrosoftAccount library (henceforth just MicrosoftAccount) for this, as suggested by the article on external provider authentication in ASP.NET.

As I said, this was internal/employee authentication, so when I was registering an application for this purpose in Azure Active Directory, I selected “Accounts in this organizational directory only (<Company name> only - Single tenant).” If you try to use the MicrosoftAccount with this setup without special care though, you’ll undoubtedly run into this problem as soon as you actually try logging in1:

Exception: invalidrequest;Description=AADSTS50194: Application ‘f552b3c4-1b53-4406-8009-03b8c5438927’(<Active Directory App Registration name>_) is not configured as a multi-tenant application. Usage of the /common endpoint is not supported for such applications created after ‘10/15/2018’. Use a tenant-specific endpoint or configure the application to be multi-tenant. Trace ID: b3029a49-cb3d-443d-9280-662398d0701d Correlation ID: 80b4dfe5-970d-44d2-9dd9-f7c799c2094c Timestamp: 2022-06-16 07:15:37Z

I feel like this is something that the MicrosoftAccount library should’ve been updated to deal with back in 2018 when this change was made, but since it apparently isn’t, we’ll have to deal with it ourselves. Here’s what you need to do in order to fix it.

When configuring the authentication handler, you’ve most likely already configured it with the client id and client secret as instructed by the article mentioned earlier; something like this:

var configuration = builder.Configuration;
var microsoftClientId = configuration["Authentication:Microsoft:ClientId"];
var microsoftClientSecret = configuration["Authentication:Microsoft:ClientSecret"];
builder.Services.AddAuthentication().AddMicrosoftAccount(
    mso =>
    {
        mso.ClientId = microsoftClientId;
        mso.ClientSecret = microsoftClientSecret;
    });

In order to get this to work with a single-tenant app, you’ll first need your Azure AD tenant id; you’ll find this one on the “overview” page of the Azure AD blade:

Azure AD overview screenshot

Add it to your configuration, and change your AddMicrosoftAccount invocation to the following:

var configuration = builder.Configuration;
var microsoftTenantId = configuration["Authentication:Microsoft:TenantId"];
var microsoftClientId = configuration["Authentication:Microsoft:ClientId"];
var microsoftClientSecret = configuration["Authentication:Microsoft:ClientSecret"];
builder.Services.AddAuthentication().AddMicrosoftAccount(
    mso =>
    {
        mso.AuthorizationEndpoint =
            $"https://login.microsoftonline.com/{microsoftTenantId}/oauth2/authorize";
        mso.TokenEndpoint =
            $"https://login.microsoftonline.com/{microsoftTenantId}/oauth2/v2.0/token";
        mso.ClientId = microsoftClientId;
        mso.ClientSecret = microsoftClientSecret;
    });

and voilà, single-tenant login works! Please let me know if this article helped you with solving your issue in the comments below. 😄


  1. I’ve replaced the real GUIDs with fake ones just in case they’re sensitive.

© 2022 Alexander Krivács Schrøder. CC-BY-SA Some Rights Reserved.  

Comments


Comments

You can view and leave comments  on GitHub, or the comments below. Last refreshed: Invalid date